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Hear from a NASA expert about how you can see this weekend's total lunar eclipse

A total lunar eclipse will be visible across North and South America the evening of May 15, according to experts at NASA.

PENNSYLVANIA, USA — Our nearest celestial neighbor has a special treat for skywatchers this weekend: a total lunar eclipse visible across North and South America the evening of May 15, according to experts at NASA.

For 84 minutes, the moon will cross the earth's shadow, and the full moon will appear a coppery red as it reflects back all of earth’s sunrises and sunsets, according to a statement. 

Also according to NASA, the eclipse will specifically be visible close to the time the moon sets on Monday morning in western parts of Europe and Africa, and the full duration of the eclipse will be visible throughout all of South America, Central America, the eastern United States and Canada, and most of Antarctica. 

In the western United States and Canada, the eclipse will be visible just after moonrise Sunday evening. 

The eclipse will not be visible in Australia, Oceania, Asia, and most of Alaska, and only partially visible from eastern parts of Europe and Africa just before the moon sets in the morning, and from the Pacific Islands and New Zealand just after the moon rises in the evening. 

Andrea Jones, NASA science communicator, joined FOX43 on May 13 to discuss what makes this lunar eclipse so special, why the moon turns red, how the moon helps us better understand our solar system, and the research NASA has been doing on the moon for the past 13 years with the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter.

To hear more of what Jones had to say, check out the interview above. 

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