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State Supreme Court will not hear appeal from former Lancaster bar owner convicted of aggravated assault

Anthony Maglietta, the former owner of Molly's Pub, is serving up to 11 years in prison for his part in an attack that left a man unconscious in 2015
Credit: Lancaster County District Attorney's Office
Anthony Maglietta

LANCASTER, Pa. — The State Supreme Court will not hear the appeal of a former Lancaster bar owner who was among the four men sentenced to state prison for beating a man unconscious outside his establishment on Christmas morning in 2015, the Lancaster County District Attorney's Office announced Tuesday.

Anthony Maglietta, the former owner of Molly's Pub on East Chestnut Street in Lancaster, was convicted of aggravated assault and related offenses in the attack, which was captured on surveillance video.

He is serving a 5½ to 11-year sentence.

A prosecutor called the group a “pack of wolves” that beat the victim for an extended time, even after he was unconscious, the DA's Office said.

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The Pennsylvania Superior Court denied his request for relief last year, and last week, the state Supreme Court followed suit, issuing an order denying Maglietta from filing in that court. 

Maglietta’s previous appeals argued that his conviction was against the weight of the evidence and that, at sentencing, he was treated harsher than the co-defendants. 

After the crime, as police viewed surveillance video, Maglietta fast-forwarded portions to conceal his involvement in the assault, prosecutors said.

The state Superior Court found that Maglietta was not treated harsher than his convicted co-defendants, and that his fast-forwarding of surveillance video showed a lack of remorse.