x
Breaking News
More () »

Lawsuit: AG Shapiro challenges EPA’s delay in identifying areas with high smog levels

PHILADELPHIA — The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recently announced that it would extend a deadline, by one year, that requires the organization t...
Environmental Protection Agency_EPA

PHILADELPHIA — The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recently announced that it would extend a deadline, by one year, that requires the organization to identify regions in each state that have levels of smog greater than federal standards.

Under the Clean Air Act, the EPA is obligated to designate areas that have not attained the new air quality standards — which was strengthened in October 2015 — within two years of the date issued.

More than a dozen states, including Pennsylvania, have taken notice.

Attorney General Josh Shapiro revealed today that he filed a lawsuit, with fourteen other states and the District of Columbia, challenging the EPA’s decision to extend the deadline, the release says.

“Last October Pennsylvania’s Department of Environmental Protection provided EPA with a detailed report identifying the regions of our state, like Philadelphia and surrounding counties, where smog is a serious health risk — but EPA is choosing to ignore that information,” Shapiro said today on the banks of the Schuylkill River in Philadelphia. “That is unacceptable. We know more than 6 million Pennsylvanians live in areas where smog levels are dangerously high and we can’t afford to wait. We are acting now to reduce smog and protect the health of every Pennsylvanian, particularly our children, the elderly, and those with respiratory illnesses. The EPA must follow the law to protect our environment and millions of people’s health.”

Governor Tom Wolf, who joined Shapiro in Philadelphia, offered remarks as well.

“The ozone standard that the EPA is delaying would have positive benefits for our children,” Wolf said. “In fact, by the EPA’s own estimate, the new ozone standard will result in 230,000 few asthma attacks in children, 340 fewer cases of acute bronchitis in children, and 160,000 fewer missed school days. More broadly, the EPA has said that the ozone standard would result in the prevention of between 300-600 premature deaths annually and the effects of inaction are inexcusable. I am proud to join in this action to compel the EPA to act on behalf of millions of Americans, to do the job they are required to do, and to stop deferring their responsibility to ensure that all Americans can enjoy their right to clean air and a healthier environment.”

Paid Advertisement

Before You Leave, Check This Out